Category: "Business Intelligence"

Open Source BI Surveys

Two colleagues have recently pointed us to two different surveys concerning Open Source Business Intelligence.

Christian Donner is running a survey in support of his upcoming talk at the June Enterprise Open Source Conference in New York.

Donner OSBI PHPsurveyor

The President of the PMI recently pointed us to this survey by the Cutter Consortium

Cutter Consortium OSBI KeySurvey

Christian's survey is a quick 4 (or 5 depending on your answer to 4) questions on use of various BI tools. The Cutter survey is more comprehensive, but can still be completed in well under an half-hour.

Please help expand the statsitical base on using open source business intelligence and fill out these surveys.

Update: We've added a module to our OSBI Lens to list surveys covering open source projectsfor business intelligence solutions. If you know of, or are running one, please let us know via the comments here, and we'll add it to the list.

Sun T2000 Try and Buy

It looks as though we've been accepted for Sun Microsystems' "Try and Buy" program. Yep, a free Niagra Server, as explained and updated by Jonathan Schwartz.

We received a quote today from Doris Hamel of Sun.

Here's a quote of the Try & Buy T2000, should you decide to purchase after the trial period.end quotation

Here's the specs and the price:

1 Config ID 4296652 Configuration: T20-104A-08GA2C 1 $8,295.00
1.1 T20-104A-08GA2C Sun Fire T2000 Server
4 core 1.0GHz UltraSPARC T1 processor,
8GB DDR2 memory (16 * 512MB DIMMs),
2 * 73GB 2.5" 10K rpm SAS hard disk drives,
1 DVDRO/CD-RW slimline drive,
2 (N+1) power supplies,
4 10/100/1000 ethernet ports,
1 serial port,
3 PCI-E slots,
2 PCI-X slots,
Solaris 10 and Java Enterprise System software
preinstalled
(Standard Configuration)
1 $8,295.00
1.2 X311L Localized Power Cord Kit North 2 N/C

We'll be using the Sun T2000 for testing of open source solutions for Business Intelligence, in support of our research both for our book project and for our strategic consulting services. We'll be reporting the results of our testing on this blog, the wiki and lens. We'll also be using Linux and Windows platforms as part of the testing. In addition to the performance and functional testing, we're also providing background information on the OSS BI projects. An example of which can be found in the series of podcasts that we just published with the folks at Pentaho. Part 3 also contains links to Part 1 and Part 2.

I also asked if Doris knew when the T2000 will be shipping? It will help in
our planning to know when to expect it. And it will help me contain my excitement at getting this new toy. :>> Clarise is pretty excited too.

Update: It looks like we'll have the machine by the end of March. April and May are going to be very busy.

Open Source Business Intelligence Squidoo Lens

Thank you for visiting, clicking through, linking to us, and emailing our Open Source Business Intelligence Lens. You have helped us keep our rank in the top 100 Squidoo lens.

small thanks

Our lens provides comprehensive links to Opens Source Business Intelligence Projects and other contents shown here:

LensContents
.

If there are other links you want us to include, please don't hesitate to contact us.

If you have not done so, visit and explore our lens.

OSC Podcast Pentaho Overview Part 3

Welcome to the conclusion of the conversation held on March 1st with James Dixon, Chief Geek, and Lance Walter, VP of Marketing for Pentaho, Clarise Z. Doval Santos, and Joseph di Paolantonio. In this third podcast, we talked mainly about community, and how Pentaho supports its community. Community is one of the most important aspects of an open source project. And communication is the most important means of building that community. Pentaho uses their forums, analysis of the conversations going on, and email to bring the community discussion directly into the heart of Pentaho development.

James points out that, by the very nature of business intelligence, the Pentaho community comes from other businesses. Because Pentaho has built a stack through cooperation with other BI open source projects, there is also a great deal of interaction among the members of communities from all of these projects, such as JasperSoft and Mondrian. But one incredible strength that the community brings to Pentaho is in the area of QA. Not just in bug identification and fixes to assure that the code conforms to specifications, but in contributing real-life use cases so that the specifications conform to real business needs and satisfies the users. Pentaho can release a version or module and begin getting feedback by the next day.

Another interesting difference between open source and proprietary software, is that a project can finish in open source. There doesn't exist the need to continually push our new, and possibly unneeded features, that exists in proprietary software, as the revenue stream for open source isn't dependent on forced upgrade license fees. In open source, when the community has determined that the project meets the needs, there are no more contributions. The project may not be releasing new code, but is far from dead. It has reached the required state of usefullness, and meets the users' needs.

Lance appreciates both the feedback, as well as the ability to turn-around the product rapidly, with freedom from the giant 18-month release cycles. Lance also discusses the training that Pentaho is making available through WebEx and other training plans. Sign up at:

https://pentaho.webex.com/pentaho

Pentaho Overview, Part 3

This podcast is about 26 minutes long.

Don't miss the other two parts of this conversation: Part 1 and Part 2.

We would like to thank DOVAL for permission to use excerpts from his hit single "Love Lost" for our opening and closing tracks.

OSC Podcast Pentaho Overview Part 2

Continuing our conversation with James Dixon and Lance Walter of Pentaho, we explore open source licensing, advantages and challenges. We talk about the needs of the users, and the drivers for open source business intelligence. One observation from James and Lance is that the professional business models that have recently come about for open source projects has provided the framework for open source enterprise applications to be developed. Some topics we covered:

  • The complexity and challenges of bringing together different open source projects into the Pentaho suite or stack, with different license types.
  • Current legal status of open source licenses
  • Motivators for developers to consider open source
  • Adoption of Open Source in the enterprise space
  • The growth of Business Intelligence overall
  • Open Source facilitates BI prototyping, customization, implementations and acceptance
  • Making BI transparent

Pentaho Overview, Part 2

Don't miss Part 1 of this podcast, OSC Podcast Overview.
We expect to post the final part of this podcast on Thursday, 2006 March 09. Come back then to listen to James and Lance talk about the Pentaho Community.

Update: Part 3 is now available for download.

We would like to thank DOVAL for permission to use excerpts from his hit single "Love Lost" for our opening and closing tracks.

OSC Podcast Pentaho Overview

More open source conversations at the open source café and this time, we were very fortunate to have Pentaho's James Dixon, Senior Architect and CTO (a.k.a "Chief Geek"), and Lance Walter, Vice President of Marketing. They were good enough to spend over an hour and an half with us on the phone. We've broken this up into three podcasts.

Part 1 is about 19 minutes and provides an overview of the Pentaho open source BI suite. James provides insight into the technology, the capabilities, integration with other applications, extensibility and how the various components were brought together into an open source BI stack. Lances talks about the Pentaho strategy in regard to capabilities and functions, components, building the suite, partners and verticals.

Pentaho Overview, Part 1"

Update: Part 2 is now up at OSC Podcast Pentaho Overview Part 2.

We expect to have part 3 posted on Thursday, 2006 March 09.

Update: Part 3 is now available for download.

We would like to thank DOVAL for permission to use excerpts from his hit single "Love Lost" for our opening and closing tracks.

Quantifying BI Benefits

One of the questions I am usually asked is: "How do you quantify a successful BI Solution?"

Computing ROI becomes a challenge for most because a BI solution brings both quantifiable and qualitative benefits. The key to calculating ROI is being able to define, measure and quantify specific benefits in terms of dollars and cents and then compare that monetary value to the cost of your investment to achieve those results. Calculating ROI is easier said than done because the challenge lies in putting monetary value to some of intangible benefits of the BI solution e.g. performance improvement, time savings, etc.

In a TDWI Report Series: Smart Companies in the 21st Century: The Secrets of Creating Successful Business Intelligence Solutions by Wayne Eckerson, the diagram below shows that BI solutions have more intangible benefits than tangible ones.
BI Tangible and Intangle Benefits
Click to view original size

The value of a BI solution increases with the number of subject areas it supports as well as the number of happy users. The BI solutions must support the business requirements. In our experience, successful BI projects are incremental. We start small but add value exponentially by adding new subject areas and users. Incremental implementation makes it easier for the users and project sponsors to see the value of the BI solution right away. It helps builds the trust and confidence hence, is able to pick up momentum and funding for the next increments of the implementation. Over time, it matures and becomes a valuable enterprise resource.

jFreeReport Added

Lance Walter, VP of Marketing at Pentaho, let us know that we had neglected to include jFreeReport in our blogroll and lens. I plagerized his email in describing jFreeReport in the lens links to reporting tools.

This site is a great resource. A consultant referred me to it and said it was the best consolidated source of information on osbi that he had found.

I had one suggestion. In the OS Reporting Projects - would you consider adding a link to JFreeReport? www.jfree.org/jfreereport . We use it as part of Pentaho, but it's also a standalone java reporting library with some pretty nice capabilities and a decent community around it.end quotation
-- email from Lance on 2006.02.23

Thank you, Lance.

OSBI Thirsty Bear Get Together

We want to extend heartfelt thanks to Nicholas Goodman, who hosted Julian Hyde of Mondrian fame, and James Dixon, Senior Architect and Chief Technology Officer ("Chief Geek") and Lance Walter, Vice President of Marketing for Pentaho, and Clarise, and me at the Thirsty Bear, the night before the Open Source Business Conference. We had over three hours of great conversation on open source, the conference, BI, the Oracle rumored purchase of JBoss, Sleepycat & Zend, and just rambling along on a bunch of topics.

Some of the more interesting geeky areas of discussion centered around data modeling, UDM, CASE tools, data stewardship and metadata management and use.

But I think that the most interesting area of discussion was in supporting the community around an open source project, and identifying the target audience for our OSBI book [update: no publishers are interested in the OSBI book as of 2007], for open source BI projects, and for BI programs in general.

While we weren't able to attend OSBC, we got a taste of it through drinking Thirsty Bear ales and bears &#59;) and we've added a module to our OSBI Lens providing links to disucssions about the OSBC.

Can Ingres Challenge Oracle for SAP

Since the OracAlum event with Terry Garnett, we've had a few meetings with Ingres folk. So, the speculation such as the following, that we picked up from our lens is of particular interest to us.

If companies like Ingres succeed, in the end there will not be any single, dominant database for SAP: not Oracle, not Ingres, not DB2, not SQL Server. Which is exactly what SAP would like to see. Too much dependence on a rival like Oracle makes SAP terribly nervous about its account control. Seeing that control split amongst a host of companies is exactly the divide-and-conquer strategy SAP would like to see in its battle royale against Oracle.end quotation
-- Can Oracle be unseated as a top SAP database? by Joshua Greenbaum, in SearchSAP.com.

Something of even more interest is what was left out of Mr. Greenbaum's article: there was no mention of the Ingres RDBMS source code being released as open source. As wtih many of the other open source projects started in 2005, Ingres is still formulating its exact strategy, including final licensing plans, building its community and support options. Still, this is a very odd omission.

For those of us who have been around for more than a decade, we remember Ingres as one of the earliest and most powerful RDBMS of its time. It certainly hasn't stood still in technology in the intervening years, though neither has its intellectual sibling, PostgreSQL, nor its offshoots such as EnterpriseDB. This is of even more interest to us because of SAP's BI/DW/DM technologies. An Ingres/SAP partnership would certainly prove more of force in the BI marketplace than the MySQL/Business Objects partnership.

The next few years will be very interesting to watch. Will large, complex RDBMS software become commoditized as other infrastructure is becoming? Will Oracle become an application house, and possibly even make more of its own RDBMS technology F/OSS? I think that is a distinct possibility.

BTW, I tried leaving a comment at the SearchSAP site, but it's "create a handle" requirement is quite broken, preventing comments from being posted.

October 2019
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      
 << <   > >>

At the beginning, The Open Source Solutions Blog was a companion to the Open Source Solutions for Business Intelligence Research Project, and book. But back in 2005, we couldn't find a publisher. As Apache Hadoop and its family of open source projects proliferated, and in many ways, took over the OSS data management and analytics world, our interests became more focused on streaming data management and analytics for IoT, the architecture for people, processes and technology required to bring value from the IoT through Sensor Analytics Ecosystems, and the maturity model organizations will need to follow to achieve SAEIoT success. OSS is very important in this world too, for DMA, API and community development.

37.652951177164 -122.490877706959

Search

  XML Feeds